The men didn’t dash ashore after being aboard a landing craft for five solid days. They just walked slowly and cautiously, fearful of bombs or mines that were thrown in the area…but this is the way we had to go ashore, and I needn’t tell you that a lot of the boys didn’t make it.

Jack H. Lieb, D-Day to Germany 1944

In 1944, Lieb was one of several correspondents who followed the Allied advance across Europe after Overlord. Working for the newsreel News of the Day, he shot silent color footage of the Utah Beach landing, and the liberation of Paris with his own 16mm camera.

(via demons)
historywars:

Free French soldiers resting in a field of poppies with several Sherman tanks.

historywars:

Free French soldiers resting in a field of poppies with several Sherman tanks.

georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:

D-Day Then and Now II

70 years ago today, on June 6th, 1944 the Western Allies’ armies landed in the Normandy region of France, beginning their push through Europe for Germany that would, combined with the Soviet onslaught from the east, result in the fall of Nazi Germany within the next year. 

In 2014, as we approach the 70th Anniversary of the D-Day invasion, Peter Macdiarmid returned to the invasion grounds to photograph the locations of some iconic - and lessor known - images from the Allied invasion. Presented here are some of the “Then” and “Now” photographs.

georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:

70 years ago today, on June 6th, 1944 the Western Allies’ armies landed in the Normandy region of France, beginning their push through Europe for Germany that would, combined with the Soviet onslaught from the east, result in the fall of Nazi Germany within the next year. 

In 2014, as we approach the 70th Anniversary of the D-Day invasion, Peter Macdiarmid returned to the invasion grounds to photograph the locations of some iconic - and lessor known - images from the Allied invasion. Presented here are some of the “Then” and “Now” photographs.

georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:

D-Day Then and Now V

70 years ago today, on June 6th, 1944 the Western Allies’ armies landed in the Normandy region of France, beginning their push through Europe for Germany that would, combined with the Soviet onslaught from the east, result in the fall of Nazi Germany within the next year. 

In 2014, as we approach the 70th Anniversary of the D-Day invasion, Peter Chris Helgren returned to the invasion grounds to photograph the locations of some iconic - and lessor known - images from the Allied invasion. Presented here are some of the “Then” and “Now” photographs.

A great war leaves the country with three armies: an army of cripples, an army of mourners, and an army of thieves.

(Post-WWI) German proverb (via demons)
greatestgeneration:

Civilian woman riding bicycle across a bridge in Italy.
Image: Gift of Robert Millett, from the collection of The National WWII Museum

greatestgeneration:

Civilian woman riding bicycle across a bridge in Italy.

Image: Gift of Robert Millett, from the collection of The National WWII Museum

vonstauffenberg:

A letter Colonel Stauffenberg penned to a friend (Wilhelm Buerklin) while recovering from his injuries in North Africa. Given that he had to write this one-handed with his non-dominant hand, he is forgiven for his shaky handwriting.
Note that he signs the letter with his nickname, Stauff.
(Can anyone read German?)

vonstauffenberg:

A letter Colonel Stauffenberg penned to a friend (Wilhelm Buerklin) while recovering from his injuries in North Africa. Given that he had to write this one-handed with his non-dominant hand, he is forgiven for his shaky handwriting.

Note that he signs the letter with his nickname, Stauff.

(Can anyone read German?)

Years ago, when ever I’d walk onto a beach I’d see red. There was blood everywhere in the water. I’d hear gunfire, the machine guns cutting down my men and their screams. The flashbacks you know, I couldn’t escape them. Sometimes I still have nightmares about it.

Sgt Bell, A Company 116th Infantry, Hitler’s War: The Western Front (via demons)

Mari-Anne Le Du clasping a book among the debris in one of the rooms of her home in the village of Buron, N. W. of Caen.

Mari-Anne Le Du clasping a book among the debris in one of the rooms of her home in the village of Buron, N. W. of Caen.

bag-of-dirt:

An American soldier of the U.S. First Army stands in the middle of rubble in the Monument of the Battle of the Nations in Leipzig after the Allies attacked the city on 18 April 1945. The huge monument commemorating the defeat of Napoleon in 1813 was one of the last strongholds of the German forces in the city to surrender. One hundred and fifty SS fanatics with ammunition and foodstuffs stored in the structure to last three months dug themselves in and were determined to hold out as long as their supplies. The First Army artillery eventually blasted the SS troops into surrender. Leipzig had already sustained heavy and frequent aerial assaults by British and U.S. forces beginning in 1943, leaving the city in complete ruins by war’s end. Leipzig, Saxony, Germany. 18 April 1945. Image taken by Eric Schwab.

bag-of-dirt:

An American soldier of the U.S. First Army stands in the middle of rubble in the Monument of the Battle of the Nations in Leipzig after the Allies attacked the city on 18 April 1945. The huge monument commemorating the defeat of Napoleon in 1813 was one of the last strongholds of the German forces in the city to surrender. One hundred and fifty SS fanatics with ammunition and foodstuffs stored in the structure to last three months dug themselves in and were determined to hold out as long as their supplies. The First Army artillery eventually blasted the SS troops into surrender. Leipzig had already sustained heavy and frequent aerial assaults by British and U.S. forces beginning in 1943, leaving the city in complete ruins by war’s end. Leipzig, Saxony, Germany. 18 April 1945. Image taken by Eric Schwab.